Beginning of life

Mohamad Mashghdost

Bandar Anzali, Iran



The beginning of life was
That I did not exist.

There was a mother.
She was my God.

It was an unrequited love.
There was a father.
He was never there.

The body came to rest
But not the mind.
I was without solace.

The sister wanted to be a mother to me.
But she was tired.
I loved the mother.
She died.

I wanted to leave
And I stayed.
I wanted to stay
And I left.

Leaving was not important
And neither was staying.
I was important,
I, who did not exist.

 

Brief portrait Mohamad Mashghdost

Homeland

Mohamad Mashghdost

Bandar Anzali, Iran

 

I’ve left my home, my heart.
Now it is like sleep and dream
And burns in the depths of my body.
The weeping mother has sent me forth.

The troubles are over, I said.
I packed and went on my way.
Body and soul I left to the ocean,
God, I still exist, thank you.

May God curse the sea that devours bodies.
Prayer and love for my sister helped me arrive.
But my eyes have seen the colors of despair.

 

Brief portrait Mohamad Mashghdost

The Pain of Loss

Matin Hosseini

Baghershahr, Iran

 

It is very painful to miss someone.
Missing someone means
that your heart stops beating for a brief moment.
Especially
if you miss your mother.
Missing her is unbearable.
I remember every detail about her.

To miss means
that something is not there.
To miss means
that it hurts.
To miss means
that you need something
that you don’t have at that moment.

But from time to time it is also good to miss something.
Sometimes we even need this impulse.
Because without the feel of missing someone,
we do not know
whom we really like
and whom we don’t like.

 

Matin Hosseini (19)

comes from a small town in Iran. At present he is attending the Kopernikus High School in Berlin-Steglitz and studying for high school graduation there. In the distant future he would like to work as a fire fighter or lawyer.

I Don’t Believe in Truth

Matin Hosseini

Baghershahr, Iran

 

Every time I hear the word truth or honesty,
I laugh quietly and say to myself:
You, you, you,
don’t be so insolent!
Up to now you have not been honest at all,
and anyway, you don’t believe in truth.

Oh, oh, oh,
do you really think
that someone would believe you
if you were honest and told the truth?
Trust me!

Today hardly anyone believes in truth.
When I tell something to someone,
they quickly say I am mad.
That is why I behave so strangely to you,
as if I were insolent and mad.
Because it is only between us.

I don’t reveal to anyone
the truth that I have concealed within myself.

 

Matin Hosseini (19)

comes from a small town in Iran. At present he is attending the Kopernikus High School in Berlin-Steglitz and studying for high school graduation there. In the distant future he would like to work as a fire fighter or lawyer.

A Second for the Innocent

Reza Hossaini

Mashdad, Iran

 

Don’t be sad about the lost time
But don’t forget either
To cry
For the graves of the women and men
It is only a moment
Of going back
It is a second
For the innocent

Don’t be proud
Pride is like a poison in your veins
Be happy
But share with others
Be happy
Though not when other people are sad
Happiness is the only thing in the world
That increases when it is spread

 

Reza Hossaini (19)

was born in Afghanistan. As a small child he fled with his family to Mashdad in Iran, where he grew up. Today lives in Berlin-Tempelhof and is currently training as a nurse. Reza loves the scent of roses, good white wine and the Persian kabāb, not to be confused with the Berlin kebab, as he points out. Life in Germany is a challenge for him.

Days of My Life

Ehsan Hamidi

Mashhad, Iran

 

Days of my life have passed.
You have to part from friends and relatives,
from all things and all people.
I cannot describe my situation on those days.
In the town where I grew up
I took leave of my friends
and put everything in God’s hand.
At the last moment
I embraced my best friend.
At that moment we were both
close to bursting into tears.
And we had to part
and we did not know when
and on what day we would meet again.

When we left our house
travelling towards Teheran,
I took leave
of the whole town,
of the streets,
of the trees.
And I tried
to store everything in my memory
and never to forget.

 

Ehsan Hamidi (18)

was born in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. He grew up in Mashhad, in north-eastern Iran, where his family took refuge from the war in Afghanistan. Due to religious and ethnic discrimination against Afghans living in Iran, in 2015 the family decided to go to Germany. Today Ehsan lives in Halle in Sachsen-Anhalt.

Search for the Dream

Ehsan Hamidi

Mashhad, Iran

 

Night again,
after midnight again,
and I am still awake again,
still awake and searching for rest.
The rest for which I have suffered so much.

Sometimes I think
I have got accustomed to emigration, to impermanence.
But what does all the melancholy then mean?
Perhaps my childish thoughts
when I left my homeland
were not aware of the meaning of emigration.
Of its sadnesses.
But now I know well
what it means
to be far from things
to which you have been accustomed for years.

Always looking
for a heart-warming justification
for enduring difficulties.
Always looking for the dream
that I followed.
The dream
for whose fulfilment many have taken a very difficult path.
But only when they arrive here
do they realise what misfortune they have found.
And that all the things
that they expected
were no more than a dream.

They journey to a new country,
dreaming of happiness.
But here there is nothing called happiness.
Here there is impermanence.
Problems multiply
and there is no way back.
Here.
In the place
for which you let go of everything that belonged to you.
In the place
worse than the one that you came from.
In the place
where everyone looks at you with the eye of contempt.

 

Ehsan Hamidi (18)

was born in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. He grew up in Mashhad, in north-eastern Iran, where his family took refuge from the war in Afghanistan. Due to religious and ethnic discrimination against Afghans living in Iran, in 2015 the family decided to go to Germany. Today Ehsan lives in Halle in Sachsen-Anhalt.

Refuge

Rohulla Amini

Mashhad, Iran

 

Oh Fatherland,
in my thoughts I am still there.

I enjoy two privileges.
One
is love of the land of my childhood.
The other
is my place of refuge.

Fortunately, place of refuge, you have no harbour.
I bear hate against all harbours.

 

Rohulla Amini

comes from Mashad in Iran. He lives and studies in Fulda.

Never Abandon Hope

Nazanin Jafari

Shiraz, Iran

 

Everyone can have a good future,
Who looks ahead and is attentive
And does not repeat mistakes.
Learns from them.
Our wishes and aims will shape our future.
They will form it.
That is why we must take care
Never to give up,
Never to abandon hope.

 

Nazanin Jafari (15)

was born in Iran, lived in Afghanistan for some time and came to Germany three years ago. She attends the Gustave Eiffel School in Pankow. Graduating from school is very important to her so that she can be successful later. Nazanin likes to go out shopping, dancing, swimming and jogging with friends. She also enjoys drawing and eating.

Love and Separation in Germany

Mahdi Rezaei

Teheran, Iran

 

Love is a matter that many are concerned with.
Some are successful, others fail.

What happens to those who love?
To those who stay together and those who part ways?

I confess: For us young men it is difficult to walk in the streets,
in the clubs, at school.
When we see how they present themselves, how they talk, how they dress.

Humans have ears, noses, eyes, senses.
They hear. They smell. They see. Feel desire.
Girls and boys.

You know, a boy falls in love via the eye.
And when he falls in love, he pursues that love.
But does he find it too?
In this state, there are only two options.
Either they stay together and grow old together.
There are only a few of that sort.
Or they break up after a short time.

But in the short time they are together, they do many things together.
They give each other deep insights into their soul.
A deep connection develops.
We men fear being exposed to ridicule.
That’s why separation is so hard for us men.

 

Mahdi Rezaei (16),

born in Iran as a refugee to Afghan parents, on love and separation in Germany.

Home

Mahdi Rezaei

Teheran, Iran

 

Live without home? I don’t want that.
Just as the mind can’t be without the body.
The blood and earth have been sucked from my land for years.
People, children, murdered. Lives destroyed.
Home? People were alone with their pain.
Home? People were abandoned without help.
Tears flow
Things are not good for my home –
Wounded by hostile friends
Wounded by allies
In mourning, defenceless

People looked for opportunities,
They got education, did everything.
Without prospects.
Home?
They too are leaving the country now.

 

Mahdi Rezaei (16)

was born and grew up in Teheran in Iran. He comes from an Afghan refugee family. In 2015 he fled from Teheran to Germany.